Bartlesville Public Library

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Bartlesville Public Library

600 S. Johnstone

Bartlesville, OK 74003

918-338-4161

Hours:

M-Th: 9am-9pm

Fri-Sat: 9am-5:30pm

Sun (Sept-May): 1:30pm-5:30pm

Days Library is Closed

bpl@bartlesville.lib.ok.us

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In keeping with our Health Literacy program, Bartlesville Public Library and BPL Literacy Services is proud to welcome Dr. James Hutchins who will be speaking on stress management on Thursday March 9, 2017, from noon to one. The presentation will be in the meeting room upstairs by the Literacy Office.

Dr. Hutchins is a psychiatrist who specializes in Psychiatry and Neurology. He is affiliated with Jane Phillips Medical center and has 36 years of experience helping patients with various mental and neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Anorexia Nervosa, Attention Deficit Disorder and other diseases and disorders.

Please mark your calendars and plan to attend this informative presentation.

Moo by Sharon Creech

http://bartlesville.polarislibrary.com/search/searchresults.aspx?ctx=3.1033.0.0.6&type=Keyword&term=moo%20creech&by=KW&sort=MP&limit=&query=&page=0&searchid=15

Yes, there is a cow in the book Moo, written by Sharon Creech.  Not only is there a cow, it is a belted Galloway – a black cow with a bold and broad stripe of white around its middle.  Originally from Scotland, the breed was nearly lost until placed on an endangered list and carefully bred for its numbers to recover.  A belted Galloway decorates the black and white cover of Moo.

Zora, Mrs. Falala’s Belted Galloway, is young and unused to cooperating with humans.  She is perfectly happy to occupy a pasture and be left alone.  Mrs. Falala is an eccentric who lives alone in Harbor Town, plays a haunting flute – and owns a cat, a hog, a bird, and Zora, the cow.

Reena and Luke along with their parents are newcomers to Maine.  A chance meeting in a doctor’s office introduces Reena’s mother to Mrs. Falala, and the story begins from there. Their mom has promised to share some books with Mrs. Falala, and Reena and Luke are designated to deliver them.  Unfortunately, they are the wrong books, and somehow, the children are determined to have been disrespectful!  As an apology, they are assigned to help Mrs. Falala, a fate worse than death in the children’s minds!

In the process of coming to know Mrs. Falala and her menagerie, the two begin to respect her knowledge, her caring and to love those animals!  Reena is chosen to show Zora at the coming livestock show.  She leans on her new friends at a nearby farm to learn to groom and train the reluctant cow.  But that too is an opportunity for Reena to grow up herself. Luke forms a bond with Mrs. Falala, as well, sharing his love of drawing with her.

This is a good story.  Creech incorporates some of the literary devices she used earlier in Love that Dog and Hate that Cat, both explorations of poetry with bold looking type and pages, and that makes reading this book fun.  (Recommended for upper elementary and middle schoolers.) — review by Jan Cravens, Youth Services assistant

 

Scythe by Neal Shusterman

http://bartlesville.polarislibrary.com/search/title.aspx?ctx=3.1033.0.0.6&pos=1

So what do you do when death is no longer a part of life?  In Neal Shusterman’s newest book, Scythe, medical and technological advances have eliminated death as a part of natural life.  But to control population, some pruning must occur.

And therefore, a group of highly trained men and women are tasked with population reduction, or gleaning.  They are called Scythes – and they follow 10 rules for the legal taking of lives and answer to no one.

Scythe Faraday chooses Rowan and Citra as apprentices after chance encounters with each.  There seems to be nothing exceptional in either teen, but Faraday has seen something in each. Unfortunately, only one will be chosen to ascend to the title of Scythe, and to complicate matters, against their best intentions, Rowan and Citra fall in love.

Training for the two begins.  It is harsh but fair; challenging but ethical.  Scythe Faraday is fair, ethical and compassionate, understanding that unless he respects death he cannot inflict it upon random citizens.  After Faraday’s untimely death (murder?), Citra is taken on by Scythe Curie, who echoes much the same values as Scythe Faraday.  Rowan, however, is taken on by Scythe Goddard, who sees himself above the law and enjoys the necessary killings as sport. Yet each, technically, follows the 10 commandments, which include: 1 – Thou shalt kill, and 2 – Thou shalt be beholden to no laws beyond these.

Scythe Goddard was the one who proposed that since Scythes were allowed only one ascendant apprentice, the Faraday apprentice not chosen should be gleaned, immediately, by the one who was.  This proposal before the MidMerica convention of Scythes, demonstrated that there are politics at work even in this highest of organizations.

Will Citra and Rowan remain confident in each other?  Will Rowan be turned to view his profession as an avenue for legalized violence?  This first of the Arc of the Scythe trilogy does answer those questions, and then sets the scene for further exploration into the ethics of living and dying and very powerful governmental bodies.

Neal Shusterman is no stranger to tackling sensitive topics. This new trilogy takes a look at a world in which death is no longer a natural occurrence. In the Unwind Dystology, Shusterman explored a world without abortion but in which parents were given the opportunity to “unwind” children when they achieved age 13.

A visit with Neal Shusterman is one in which story telling is the point.  But along the way, he forces us to think about the possibilities our futures could hold. — review by Jan Cravens, Youth Services assistant

 

 

 

What to read, what to read? Always a dilemma – the books keep coming and the list keeps growing!

I have loved reading as long as I can remember. I read when I can and what I can – old, new, mystery, romance, historical fiction, biography, etc., etc.  I hope to share some titles and reviews to keep in mind when that “what to read?” question pops up again.

Check back often for these reviews on our Kids and Teens pages!

Jan Cravens, Youth Services Assistant

 

 

Join Miss Laura in the Youth Services department for storytime!

Sessions are held all year round every Wednesday and Thursday as follows:

Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10:00 for Babies & Toddlers

Wednesdays and Thursdays at 11:00 for Preschoolers

Thursdays only at 1:00 for All Ages

Stories, songs, rhymes, playtime, puzzles, coloring, occasional crafts, laughter and fun!

No cost and no registration is required.

Beginning Wednesday, February 1st through April 12th, AARP (the American Association of Retired Persons) volunteers will be giving free tax preparation assistance here at the library!

Days: Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays
Hours: 9am – 3pm
Location: Meeting Room B (near the reference desk)

Assistance will be given on a first come, first served basis. Please bring your identification (e.g. driver license), Social Security numbers for your entire household, a copy of last year’s tax return, all W-2 forms, 1099s, a photo ID, and a Social Security card.

If you make less than $64,000 per year you can file online with http://myfreetaxes.com

Federal tax forms can be found online at https://www.irs.gov/forms-pubs or by calling 1-800-829-3676. Oklahoma tax forms can be found online at https://www.ok.gov/tax/Forms_&_Publications/Forms/ or by calling 1-800-522-8165.

And if you have any questions, just call the reference desk at 918-338-4168.

meetsomeonenew
Hi there!
We hope your school year is off to a great start! For the next couple of weeks, we’re going to be focusing on a section of the library many people don’t even know about: the biographies! A biography is a book that tells the true story of someone’s life. You might think that reading a biography sound boring, but you can learn a lot about some really cool people like Ham the Astrochimp (the first monkey astronaut) or The Boy Who Invented TV. Come check out our display or look at other biographies, written for kids just like you!