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Bartlesville Public Library

600 S. Johnstone

Bartlesville, OK 74003

918-338-4161

Hours:

M-Th: 9am-9pm

Fri-Sat: 9am-5:30pm

Sun (Sept-May): 1:30pm-5:30pm

Days Library is Closed

bpl@bartlesville.lib.ok.us

Driving Directions

Kids

Sign up now, at the library’s Youth Services Department, for the 8th annual LEGO Creation Contest!

The contest is free to all and participants will be divided into three age groups: Kindergarten through 4th grade, 5th grade through 8th grade, and 9th grade through adult.  First, second and third place will be awarded in each category with one overall grand prize being awarded.  Winners will receive LEGO products and ribbons.

Contestants will build their LEGO creations at home using their own LEGOs, abiding by the rules and criteria noted on the registration form.  They will then drop off their entries at the upstairs meeting room of the library on Saturday, April 29th from 9:00 am to 11:00 am.  The room will be closed at 11:00 am to allow judging to take place.

Public viewing will begin that same day at 1:00pm, with awards being given out  soon after.  Winning entries will be shown in the library’s lobby display cases from April 30th through May 6th.

“I hope to see lots of sign-ups for this competition,” says Laura Pryce, Youth Services librarian.  “And it would be great to have more adult competitors this year!”  To register, come by the Youth Services Desk at the Bartlesville Public Library or call 918-338-4170 for more information.

 

The Night Gardener by Jonathan Auxier                     http://bartlesville.polarislibrary.com/search/searchresults.aspx?ctx=3.1033.0.0.6&type=Keyword&term=the%20night%20gardener%20auxier&by=KW&sort=MP&limit=&query=&page=0&searchid=1

The Night Gardener by Terry & Eric Fan          http://bartlesville.polarislibrary.com/search/searchresults.aspx?ctx=3.1033.0.0.6&type=Keyword&term=the%20night%20gardener%20fan&by=KW&sort=MP&limit=AVAILABILITY%20>%200&query=&page=0&searchid=2

 

It’s not often that two books are published with the same title – and that both are really good!  So when The Night Gardener (Jonathan Auxier) was nominated for an Oklahoma Library Association’s 2017 Sequoyah Award, it was apparent The Night Gardener (the Fan Brothers) would need to be read as well.

Auxier’s book is up for the Children’s and the Middle Grades Sequoyah Awards, with a target audience of grades 4 to 8. It is spooky and kept me reading.  The Fans’ book is for children in Kindergarten through 3rd grade.  It is a beautifully illustrated book with an important message.

A spooky setting, orphaned children and a cursed house set the background for Auxier’s book. Molly and Kip were orphaned when the ship bringing them from Ireland to England sank.  Molly assumed care for her brother, and they came to work for the Windsor family in their remote, dank, overcast home.  Something was clearly wrong from the beginning!  A portrait of the family from the summer before showed that the good health and happiness radiating from them in the portrait had given way to forgetfulness, pale skin and haunted looks.

Outside the home was an ancient tree.  It had grown to be part of the very foundation of the house – and Kip was forbidden to trim the branches which brushed against the house when the winds blew.  There was a feeling that someone was entering the house through its locked doors, and making mischief with the family’s belongings.

It soon becomes apparent that the change in Mr. Windsor includes heavy gambling debts.  The change in Mrs. Windsor includes shortness of memory and temper.  Older child Alistair is mean, coming near to torturing his little sister, Penny, is frightened.

The story comes to a satisfying conclusion – but only after some truly creepy happenings!

_____________________________________________________________________

The Fan Brothers (Terry and Eric) are both artists, and Eric a writer.  This is their first children’s book, filled with gorgeous illustrations.

Grimloch Lane is a sad place.  Houses are grey and the people who live there walk with heads down in isolation.  One night, however, change begins.  When William awakes, he hears a commotion in the street.  Running outside, he discovers that someone has created a wise owl from a nearby tree! Each day, a new shape appears from the foliage in the trees. And the neighborhood begins to notice and to spend time outside and to be not so sad!  Each morning, William is excited to awake and see what was new.

One night after the neighborhood festivities, William notices a stranger in the street.  William follows the stranger to the Park.  Sure enough, it is the Night Gardener and he asked for William’s help.  William worked so hard he fell asleep but when he woke, there was a gift from the Night Gardener – a pair of garden shears.  The Gardener no longer appeared, but William has become the shaper of the newly busy and happy neighborhood.  –   Review by Jan Cravens, Youth Services assistant

 

 

 

We very much appreciate all the LEGOs that have been donated to the library!  However, we still need more before we can kick off our monthly club. If you run across any unused LEGO materials during your spring cleaning, bring ’em in and let’s fill up the case!

 

Anna and the Swallow Man by Gavriel Savit

The Boy on the Wooden Box by Leon Leyson

http://bartlesville.polarislibrary.com/search/searchresults.aspx?ctx=3.1033.0.0.6&type=Keyword&term=anna%20swallow%20man&by=KW&sort=RELEVANCE&limit=AVAILABILITY%20>%200&query=&page=0&searchid=6

 

http://bartlesville.polarislibrary.com/search/searchresults.aspx?ctx=3.1033.0.0.6&type=Keyword&term=boy%20wooden%20box&by=KW&sort=RELEVANCE&limit=AVAILABILITY%20>%200&query=&page=0&searchid=7

 

On August 25, 2000, 93 headstones and monuments were damaged in the Jewish section of Rose Hill Memorial Park in Tulsa.  One of the young men who was arrested was heavily tattooed in swastikas and other Nazi symbols.  Now again we are hearing that one of our synagogues in Tulsa has received threats of violence. And Jewish cemeteries in St. Louis and Philadelphia recently were damaged, with more than 100 headstones in each cemetery desecrated.

There are many books in our library using the Holocaust as background for fiction, and many books in our non-fiction section which discuss the persecution of European Jews during World War II.  Many survivors of concentration camps have written their stories for our young and old to read and learn from.

Two fairly new books are particularly timely – one fiction and one non-fiction.

Anna and the Swallow Man by Gavriel Savit is a beautiful book. Suitable for 8th grade into adult, this book follows the fictional journey of a young girl and her protector through the Polish countryside. It is 1939 and Anna (or sometimes Ana), aged 7, is waiting for her father to return from lecturing at the University.  Unknown to her, he has been arrested in a roundup of university professors and lecturers, and will eventually die on the way to Dachau. Her father is a linguist and she has learned a variety of languages from him.  As she wanders the streets, unable to return to her home since she has no key, she encounters the Swallow Man.

The Swallow Man is a shadowy figure who can fade into any background or command attention of the most respectful kind.  He advises her, “Stay out of sight, for as long as you can.” And, doing so, she begins to follow him until they are united in eluding German soldiers searching in the dark. And throughout the book she follows him, crisscrossing Poland and cleverly avoiding capture at checkpoints and in cities for more than a year. Readers never learn all there is to know about the Swallow Man, except that he saves Anna and sends her to safety across what we assume to be the Baltic Sea. And we sense that in saving her, he has offered himself to be lost.

The second book, The Boy on the Wooden Box, is a memoir of one of Schindler’s Jews – Leon Leyson or Lieb Lejzon “ as was his given name”.  Schindler’s Jews were a group of nearly 1200 Jews saved by industrialist Oskar Schindler.  Schindler was able to move the workers in his factory out of Germany and into Czechoslovakia in order to save them.  His story is seen in the movie, Schindler’s List. (available in the Adult dvd section)

Leyson was a true resident of Krakow as a child, moving there at 8 from a small village in the Polish countryside. When the Nazi army drove through Poland in 1938, Leon and his family continued safely for some time – until the night the Gestapo came to their home, beat his father and arrested him.  Upon his release, Leon’s father quietly worked doing odd jobs.  He was called one day to a factory taken over by Nazi sympathizers.  The owner watched him do the job he had been called for, then offered Leon’s father employment.  The owner was Oskar Schindler.

Because his father worked for Schindler, the family remained safe from deportation, even though they were impoverished and subject to the irrational behaviors of German soldiers.  In 1941, the family moved into the newly constructed ghetto in Krakow.  Life continued to deteriorate as neighbors and friends were rounded up for transport to concentration camps.  Schindler was granted permission to build a sub camp next to his factory as a time saving ruse – and after months of separation from his family, Leon and his mother were placed on a hire list from Schindler’s factory, and the family was reunited. The rest is history – Schindler miraculously managed to protect his Jews until the end of the war.

The title reference is understood when we learn that Leon was so small (at age 12) that he had to stand on a wooden box to do his job at the factory – and was saved because his small hands were needed to do tedious cleaning of gun barrels that an adult was too large to do.

Both of these books, one fiction, and one not, set in Poland in the late 1930’s and early 1940’s demonstrate the terrors of the Nazi vendetta against the Jews.  Each recounts the careless disregard of human life which results from the separation of populations into “us” and “them.” – Review by Jan Cravens, Youth Services assistant

 

 

The Bartlesville Public Library received a “Zoo Funds for Kids” grant from the Oklahoma City Zoo in order to present two programs during Spring Break, which will be held in the Upstairs Meeting Room on Monday, March 13th.  They will be bringing small, live animals!

10:00AM – Just For Kids -“Bear Wants More” – Bear finds some roots to eat, but that’s not enough.  He wants more!  His friends help him find berries, clover, and fish to eat but that’s not enough. HE WANTS MORE!   As participants will  discover in Karma Wilson’s award-winning book, “Bear Wants More,” springtime brings lots of new food choices.  Folks from the Oklahoma City Zoo will explore all the delicious, gross, and downright weird things animals eat during their springtime buffet!”

1:00PM – For Middle School and High School only – “Ready Set Vet” – This great program is designed to introduce teens to the world of veterinary medicine.  Participants will solve a real vet case and do fun, hands-on activities!

These programs are free and open to the public.  Call 918-338-4170 for more information.

 

 

The annual “Battle of the Books” will be held in the newly-renovated Central Middle School auditorium on Thursday, March 9th at 7:00pm.  This event is open to the public so come and witness the showdown between teams from Central, St. John Catholic School, Osage Hills School, and Madison Middle School as they compete for medals and the honor of keeping the traveling trophy at their school for the year.  The participants prepare by reading the current Intermediate Sequoyah Book Award nominees and then, at the Battle, try to buzz in the fastest and most often to answer questions about the books.  This is a fun, fast-paced, quiz-bowl style competition that spotlights some great books and encourages teamwork from the participating students.  Funding is provided by the Bartlesville Friends of the Library.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Whale Rider by Witi Ihimaera

Whale rider

http://bartlesville.polarislibrary.com/search/title.aspx?ctx=3.1033.0.0.6&pos=2

The current news includes the heartbreaking story of pilot whales beaching themselves on a New Zealand island, dying in droves as the residents try to save them.  I cannot but think of the book, The Whale Rider, written by Witi Ihimaera, every time I see the pictures.

This is an old book (1987) but it is one that bears rereading.  It is rich in Maori history, and is told in the present tense as well as in the words of the legends and myths showing the Maori relationship with the gods and the creatures of the sea.

“If the story has a beginning, it is with Kahu, “a disappointing girl born in the line of the great chiefs.  By custom, leadership falls from the eldest son to the eldest son.  To have a great-granddaughter interrupt the line was an inconsolable sorrow to Great-grandfather Koro.  He vows to have nothing to do with the child.  However, she adores him from the first moment she sees him, and will not be dissuaded from loving him no matter how cruelly he ignores her.

When Koro begins to despair of passing the mantle, he starts classes in Maori traditions, hoping to find a fitting young man to come into the line.  While he teaches inside, Kahu is learning outside.  Not surprisingly, the teaching takes place in the community building.  When Kahu was born off island, her afterbirth was brought back to her island and community, and buried just there.  Legend has it that the first golden whale rider threw his last spear to mark his people – and that it had landed, just there.

The story follows Kahu’s young life and her ability to communicate with the sea and its hosts.  When whales begin to beach themselves on her island, she is the one to save them from total destruction.

There are tears to be shed here, and much laughter as we meet the various family members, including Koro and his wife, Nanny Flowers, queen of the motorcycle gang, and the narrator, Kahu’s uncle.  This book is engrossing and touching, and unfortunately, timely.  It has been made into an amazing movie worthy of the book. – Review by Jan Cravens, Youth Services assistant